My Top Five Bob Dylan Songs.

Posted: May 25, 2011 in Music

For Bob Dylan’s seventieth birthday this week, Rolling Stone put out a list of the 70 Greatest Dylan Songs.  I’m no authority, so I’m not about to quibble with the ordering.  In fact, it says plenty about the uncanny depth of this essential artist’s discography that he has so many more than 70 great songs.  (So many prominent musical artists stop with the greatness after just three or four.)  But Bob Dylan means a lot of things to a lot of people, and I thought it would be fun to name the songs that mean the most to me (off the top of my head).

My mom loves Bob Dylan and he means maybe the most to that generation, who came up with Dylan in the 1960s.  That’s how I first came to hear Bob Dylan, with his protest songs and folk tunes.  “Blowin’ In The Wind”  (Rolling Stone’s #20) and “The Times They Are A-Changin’” (RS #28) were big around my house.  When I was in college, I had a friend who listened to literally nothing besides Bob Dylan, which at the time I thought was pretty pretentious but in retrospect, there’s no faulting that dude’s taste.  If you listen to nothing but Bob Dylan, you’re still getting as diverse a catalogue as could possibly be imagined from just one artist who writes and performs all of his own songs.  The guy who sang “Like A Rolling Stone” (RS #1, predictably) and the guy who sang “Lay, Lady, Lay” (RS #24) hardly even sound like the same guy, let alone the guy who recorded Love And Theft.  That’s why Dylan has stayed so relevant for so long, because of that creative restlessness and constant evolution.

Anyway, like I said, I’m hardly an authority on Bob Dylan and his music, though the older I get the more I have learned to appreciate him.  Quite honestly, he’s come to mean more to me through the legion of artists that he has influenced.  Over the years, I’ve noticed a trend in some of my all-time favorite musical acts, from Bruce Springsteen to Jimi Hendrix to U2 to Cat Power to The Roots to motherfuckin’ Johnny Cash – they’ve all spent a significant amount of time not only talking about Bob Dylan, but performing his songs.  At a certain point, your influences’ influences become important to you almost as much as your influences have, and so it has been with Bob Dylan.

So here are my top five songs, ranked in order of preference which is sure to change by tomorrow.  These would be my top five if someone asked me TODAY.

5. Series Of Dreams (not on Rolling Stone’s list)

This one came to me through a Springsteen interview.  Generally, when Springsteen says something, I listen, and when he recommends a song, ten to one I’m gonna check it out.  I like the imagery of this song’s title, and I especially like the momentum of this song.  Without getting too precious about it, this song sounds to me like the passage of time, and it sounds more optimistic than not (although as it happens, Dylan’s lyrics are a little more cautious here than the upbeat tune suggests).

4. Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door (RS #25)

You can tell a person’s age from how they came to certain Bob Dylan songs.  I got into this one through Guns N’ Roses, so that’s the generation we’re dealing with.  Dylan wrote this song as part of his soundtrack to Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid (which he also appeared in), a forever-underrated Sam Peckinpah movie that has come to mean almost as much to me as the song does. This song has such an immediate and potent mythic quality that it’s easy to see why it’s such a strong entry-way for younger romance-minded dudes like me into the Dylan discography.

3. Not Dark Yet (RS #50)

A lot of Dylan songs can be inscrutable.  It’s clear from most of the journalism I have ever read about the man that a lot of critics have a lot of fun trying to decipher his lyrics and deciphering how they may apply to his life story.  I’m not that kind of a listener.  Sometimes I like it best when I can tell what the song’s about, and when the melody fits the words so perfectly.  The music here is a pretty simple and steady (but lovely) drone, almost a dirge, and if I had to guess, this song is about getting older, seeing the end coming and taking the moment to recollect before it gets here.  Hopefully I’m not near that point in my life yet, but there’s something about that idea that has always been very profound to me.  This is why people that know me best still struggle to decide whether I’m an old soul or an immature one.

2. Shelter From The Storm (RS #66)

I put this song on a mixtape I made for my baby niece when she was first born.  I know that there are several more valid interpretations of this song in many other contexts, but the great thing about music is its malleability of meaning to each listener, and to me, this song sounds like solace and safe harbor.  And that’s what spending time with my niece means to me.

[http://videos.sapo.pt/EMgqHJeedK09dMHO9cVt]

1. Boots Of Spanish Leather (not on Rolling Stone’s list)

One of Dylan’s earliest songs, this is just plain one of the better love songs ever written, to my ears anyway.  Is there more I ought to say about it?  Take a listen:

[http://www.mojvideo.com/video-boots-of-spanish-leather/915d35e9ddf227342340]

Not that he will ever read this, but Happy Birthday Bob Dylan.  You have affected a lot of lives in a deeply meaningful way with your art, which is art’s highest possible purpose.

   

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s